Monthly Archives: August 2014

Did you know …?

Did you know …?

drop out

  • To ‘drop out’ is to leave school or university before finishing the course.
    Most students drop out in the first term.
    ‘Drop out’ also means reject social conventions and live a different life
    I’m going to drop out and live in a commune.
    And it can also mean no longer used or become unfashionable.
    The word ‘healthful’ has dropped out of everyday English

Source

English Idioms

English Idioms

Reality Check

something that reminds you of how things really are. Jakarta Globe: <<It’s easy to be ignorant of your surroundings when you’re in a position of power. That is why every once in a while, one needs a reality check. Statesmen and women go to the streets to see the reality of the people’s lives; companies conduct CSR programs; and the religious get out of their comfort zone to feel the suffering of the deprived.

 

Source

English or not English?

English or not English?

Patricia Ryan has spent the past three-plus decades teaching English in Arabic countries — where she has seen vast cultural (and linguistic) change.

“English is big business and languages are dying as never before. Is there a connection? Is this another manifestation of McDonaldisation – the undesirable face of globalization? Do we want to lose the variety of languages and all the rich culture that comes with them?”

[ted id=1106]

She is toooo amazing not to share her talk.
Still, please learn English, but learn it with a good enough reason!:)

What makes a word ‘real’ ?

What makes a word ‘real’ ?

One could argue that slang words like ‘hangry,’ ‘defriend’ and ‘adorkable’ fill crucial meaning gaps in the English language, even if they don’t appear in the dictionary. After all, who actually decides which words make it into those pages? Language historian Anne Curzan gives a charming look at the humans behind dictionaries, and the choices they make.

[ted id=2022]

English professor Anne Curzan actually encourages her students to use slang in class. A language historian, she is fascinated by how people use words—and by how this changes.

English Idioms

English Idioms

GET A GRIP

If we say “get a grip on something,” that means to try to understand how to deal with it. You can also say “come to grips with.” City council is trying to get a grip on rising street repair costs. But how about “Get a grip” by itself? That’s short for “Get a grip on yourself,” and it means “assert your self-control.” Plymouth Herald (UK): <<He passed a six month prison sentence – suspended for two years – before adding “if you commit any sort of offence – violence, drunk and disorderly, drugs or anything else – it’s odds on you will have to serve that sentence.” …

He also ordered Widdicombe to complete 100 hours of unpaid work and pay an £80 victim surcharge.

After Widdicombe thanked the Recorder, he replied: “For goodness’ sake, get a grip and behave yourself.”

Source/English Idioms FB