Monthly Archives: March 2012

How to Use English Punctuation Correctly (2)

How to Use English Punctuation Correctly (2)

Use the semicolon and colon properly.

The semicolon ( ; ) has a few uses.
Use a semicolon to separate two related but independent clauses. Note that, if the two clauses are very wordy or complex, it is better to use a period (full stop) instead.

People continue to worry about the future;our failure to conserve resources has put the world at risk.

Use a semicolon to separate a complex series of items, especially those that contain commas.
I went to the show with Jake, my close friend; his friend, Jane; and her best friend, Jenna.

The colon ( : ) has multiple uses.
Use the colon to introduce a list. Be careful not to use a colon when denoting a regular series. sually, the word following suggests the use of a colon. Use only after a full sentence which ends in a noun.
The professor has given me three options:to retake the exam, to accept the extra credit assignment, or to fail the class.

INCORRECT – The Easter basket contained: Easter eggs, chocolate rabbits, and other candy.

Did you know … ?

Did you know … ?

English is the language of navigation, aviation and of Christianity; it is the ecumenical language of the World Council of Churches.

Over 400 million people use the English vocabulary as a mother tongue, only surpassed in numbers, but not in distribution by speakers of the many varieties of Chinese.

Over 700 million people, speak English, as a foreign language.

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Just for FUN!

Just for FUN!

Fun With Words –¬†Unusual Word Forms (2)

The singular form of braces, when used in the orthodontic sense, is bracket. One bracket per tooth is attached when someone gets braces.

Hair is a singular word that suggests more than its plural, hairs.

The plural words abbes, abys, adventures, bas, bos, bras, bulgines, cares, chapes, cites, cosines, deadlines, esquires, fras, gamines, gaus, glassines, gues, hos, kavas, kas, larges, las, los, lownes, marques, mas, millionaires, mis, moras, mos, multimillionaires, nervines, ogres, pas, pis, pos, posses, prelates, princes, pros, sagenes, saltines, shines, sightlines, squires, tartines, timelines, tyrranes, and usures all become different singular words if you add another s onto the end of each. Many of them switch from masculine plural form to feminine singular form.
Gender

Widower is the only word in the English language whose masculine form is longer than its feminine form, which is widow.

Demirep is the only word in the English language which is made feminine by applying a prefix, rather than a suffix, to the masculine form, which is rep.

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Did you know … ?

Did you know … ?

American English Tips

Public Behavior

Always shake hands: Americans shake hands when greeting each other. This is true for both men and women. Other forms of greeting such as kissing on the cheeks, etc., is generally not appreciated.

Look your partner in the eye: Americans look each other in the eyes when they are speaking as a way of showing that they are sincere.

Don’t hold hands: Same sex friends do not usually hold hands or put their arms around each other in public in the United States.

Smoking is Out!!: Smoking, even in public places, is strongly disapproved of by most Americans in the modern United States.

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